Tips to Learn German Language Fast – series 1/6

August 10, 2009 by · 1 Comment 

Learn German Language . org 6 important Tips on How to Learn the German Language Fast

Seeing the increasing amount of interest to learn German, we have felt the urge providing you with some tips on how to proceed . Many are planning  holiday to Germany or Austria added to the benefits of mastering a second language. That all aside we would all like to learn a language as fast as possible.

1. Do not procrastinate. Once you set a time-plan and resources, stick to it for at least a month. Then evaluate your progress and make modifications on your following month if needed. maybe within that month you have learned what you intended to.

Tip 2 will be coming soon, be sure to bookmark us.

What is the best book for beginning to learn German?

November 11, 2008 by · 3 Comments 

What is the best book for beginning to learn German? I would really like to learn German. Rosetta stone is too expensive, and I need a book, because I don’t have any fluent German speakers accessible to me. Please recommend a good book for beginning German that isn’t massively expensive.
Is that in reference to the teach yourself Beginners German or teach yourself German?

I could recommend teach yourself simply and easily, you can read the book review here. Aside from Rosetta Stone german there are other German Language Courses that might suit your budget. Try out our free course for instance (sign up on the right)

Best regards

What is the best way to learn German without being able to speak it with native/other speakers?

October 19, 2008 by · 3 Comments 

What is the best way to learn German without being able to speak it with native/other speakers? I am trying to learn the German language and am using the Pimsleur German and Berlitz German programs. I am wondering if there is a faster, easier, or better way to do it. I also have a very large library of German teaching books with exercises, but I have yet to use them very much.

You can use an audio-book-cd, than you can buy the book in english and in german. If you want to speed up german language learning and speaking German fast. I suggest to really combine your materials (reading, courses, movies etc).

How long will it take to learn German?

September 12, 2008 by · 12 Comments 

I'm a grad student in history and decided to start learning the German language on my own. How long will it take (educated guess), and how much time should I dedicate a week, to learn the language fluently? What kind of study tips and resources would you recommend (audiotapes, books, etc) This question is for everyone, but especially for those who have learned German.

I think that it depends on your definition of "fluently". In fact, a person will never know everything about a certain language, not even about his own mothertongue – you never stop learning (e.g. not even Goethe knew all the words of the German language). But I think you can get to a level that would permit you to communicate with others in just a few weeks – if you practice a lot (which means: not just learning, but also applying what you have learned by trying to communicate with others).

Some study tips:

The most important seems to me practicing, hearing and reading as much as you can:

Hearing: Right from the start, I would listen to German radio stations (and television, if possible) -of course, you won't understand a word, but you can learn the German pronounciation by doing that. It is very important to do that at the beginning of your studies -it prevents you from getting a strong accent. Or you could see films on DVD in German language subtitled in English and then vice-versa. If you hear a sentence in German, try to repeat it to practice the pronounciation.

Practicing: On the internet, you could practice German by using the German version of Yahoo! Questions or by visiting German chatrooms. As soon as you understand a simple question try to give an answer.
Or you could try to find Germans living in your town and give them lessons in German conversation in exchange for lessons in English.

Reading: You could visit the websites of German newspapers (Frankfurter Allgemeine, TAZ, etc.) or you could do some internet research on topics (history, etc.) that interest you in German (as you certainly know already a lot about these topics this will help you to understand the websites and some of them will also be available in English, so can compare what you understood with what was meant).

I hope that this will help, that you will enjoy learning German and I wish you all the best for your studies!

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Responses To Expect When Traveling In Germany

October 20, 2007 by · 2 Comments 

Learning the German language has many advantages especially if you’re a foreigner taking a walk down German streets. There’s one fact that you need to realize too. Although learning the language could give you numerous praises and benefits, you have to be careful in using it as well.

Our nationalities differ from one country to the next. If there’s anything you’re accustomed to doing in you’re own country, think twice before you attempt in doing it in another nation. If you visit Germany or get into a conversation with a German speaking person, an important point you need to remember is the way how you carry a conversation.

Don’t ever forget that the German language has a distinction between formal and informal conversation. If you’re unsure how to respond to the German speaking person you’re talking to, better stick to the rules of the language. Another thing is that you may find easy to learn and remember the basics of the language (greetings, common phrases) but in any way, do not get confused with the response you’re going to get. You’re not in your own country anymore so expect changes from the people around.

Shopping in Germany can be exciting; what with your skill to talk to the sales person in German. But don’t get offended if German staff just doesn’t warm up to you; it’s not being rude or anything so just move on with your German adventures.

Also, remember that Germans appreciate it more if you can talk to them in their own language. Putting all your efforts and hard work in learning the language wouldn’t be as rewarding as when you start to put it to test with a native German speaker.

But if you think you can’t handle it any longer and you feel the need to express what you want to say in pure English, you can always turn to someone and say “Sprechen Sie Englisch?” (SHPREKH-en zee ENG-lish), which means “Do you speak English?” and you’ll surely get the response you need.